In the News

WHERE WE'VE BEEN FEATURED LATELY:

 
 

Forbes: Plastic Chainmail Forges A Link Between Moviemaking And Architecture
12 July, 2017

I’m always curious about how businesses come up with their names. But I think having one bestowed upon you by award-winning actor Viggo Mortensen – or if we’re giving him his full title, Aragorn, son of Arathorn – is the coolest origin story I’ve ever heard.

And that is exactly what happened for New Zealand-based materials company, Kaynemaile. Early on in founder Kayne Horsham’s role as Artistic Director for the Lord of the Rings (LOTR) movie trilogy, they hit a snag. “I was spending a lot of my time investigating local industries, to see what they could do,” he said. “We were also on the lookout for niche elements or ideas that we could collaborate with people on, to meet the specific – and occasionally, weird – needs of this project.”

And one of the key things that Kayne had to source was chainmail. If you’ve seen any of the LOTR movies, you’ll know that almost every character wears some (except the elves – they have plate armor, but I digress). So, it needed to look, move and sound authentic on screen, while also being robust enough to cope with a long shoot and multiple battle sequences. Thankfully, humans have been making chainmail since the 5th century and it was the main type of armor used by soldiers right up until the 16thcentury… so we know lots about it. Kayne managed to find a producer in India, but, the resulting chainmail was incredibly heavy, and the actors and stuntpeople really struggled to perform in it.

So Kayne and his team started experimenting with other materials, eventually coming up with a metal-coated plastic mail that weighed considerably less than traditional mail. And I have to say, having now held some of it in my hand, it is extremely convincing, even up close. Kayne talked me through the process they used for ‘Kayne’s Maile’, “We started with lengths of polypropylene plumbing tube, and cut it into rings on this little machine, before hand-assembling it into an interconnected mesh. Then we electroplated pure silver onto the rings, followed by copper via electroforming.”


Kaynemaile Winner of ExportNZ Award for Innovation in Export

Kaynemaile wins the Innovation in Export Award at the ExportNZ ASB Export Wellington Awards
21st June, 2017

We are thrilled! On a whim we decided to enter the inaugural ExportNZ ASB Export Wellington Awards. We were named a finalist (which was exciting it itself!), then on Wednesday we were announced the winner of the Innovation in Export Award. 

The MFAT Innovation in Export Award recognises a Wellington business displaying outstanding innovation in exporting. Innovation means coming up with a product / pathway / positioning / promotion or pricing approach that is novel in the way in which it has been applied in the business. The business must show how this innovation allows it to capture more money, market share or to continue a sustainable position.

Our founders, Kayne Horsham and Robyn Downham have surrounded themselves with skillful and dedicated team members who collectively strive for the same goals. All who work at Kaynemaile are passionate about the company and the product — this flows through everything we do. We are more than a product. We have become a company that others want to work with, collaborate with and succeed with. 

We are wrapped with the win. Thank you!

The Kaynemaile Team


Plastic is recycled to make architectural mesh
12th June, 2017

Kaynemaile™ architectural mesh, from “Lord of the Rings” set designer Kayne Horsham, draws on the designer’s experience in the art of creating chainmail. During his work on the fantasy trilogy, he wove millions of rings into armor robes for Viggo Mortensen and Orlando Bloom.

Horsham experimented with meshes using plastic via an injection molding process, eventually creating a 3D material made of solid rings with no joints or seams. With this process, Kaynemaile can be produced in a range of sizes and colors. The material he uses is made from a recyclable, UV-stabilized, high-spec polycarbonate, which is resistant to fire and difficult to damage.

The mesh is being used for interiors and exteriors around the world—forming dividing screens in a New Zealand airport, walls on the Aukland University campus, a car park facade in Australia and in other novel applications. The material can act as an effective wind and rain screen due to its cross-sectional density—using two layers of mesh, weather penetration may be as low as 5 percent—and it can help to control the level of light entering a building, promising up to 75 percent solar protection.


Mental Floss: Lord of the Rings Art Director Now Designs Chainmail for Buildings
22nd May, 2017

The process of creating chainmail hasn’t changed much over the last few thousand years. When artist Kayne Horsham first began designing the chainmail worn by the dwarves, elves, and orcs in the Lord of the Rings movies, he settled for links that had to be connected by hand. He’s since come up with a weaving process that’s faster, cheaper, and applicable on a much larger scale.

As Co.Design reports, Kaynemaile, a new type of building material, was inspired by Kayne Horsham’s time as creature, armor, and weapons art director for the Lord of the Rings trilogy. To assemble the chainmail used in costumes, the New Zealand-based designer and his crew made millions of rings out of plastic and joined them together one by one. The fully-linked garment was then dipped in silver to give it an authentic look.

It wasn’t until the series ended that Horsham came up with an approach that was both convenient and cost-effective. For his new technique, he uses an injection molding process that churns out massive sheets of polycarbonate chainmail. The material is lighter and stronger than glass, takes little energy to produce, and is completely recyclable. And it has 21st century uses outside of fantasy films and Renaissance fairs—Horsham is marketing the material as an “architectural mesh” to drape over the facades of buildings.


Co Design: The Lord Of The Rings’ Weapons Designer Invented This Cool New Material
22nd May, 2017

From Viggo Mortensen’s chainmail to architectural facades.

On the set of The Lord of the Rings, actor Viggo Mortensen had a nickname for the chainmail he and his costars wore: Kaynemail.

It was a reference to Kayne Horsham, the film’s creature, armor, and weapons art director. Though you might only see it on screen for a millisecond, each chainmail shirt that Horsham and his crew created contained 80,000 rings–which had to be linked and woven by hand. Over the course of three years, they interlocked millions of rings for chainmail suits worn by Mortensen’s Aragorn, Legolas, Gimli and crew–not to mention hundreds of Orcs–in the series of films’ epic battle sequences. Once a shirt was completed, it was coated in pure silver to strengthen it and make it ready for the cameras–and all the fake blood.

Horsham knew there had to be a better way than the tedious process of hand-weaving the chainmail. Fast forward six years, and Horsham had created a injection molding process to mass produce polycarbonate chainmail–which he dubbed Kaynemaile, in honor of Mortensen’s nickname for the stuff.

But these days, Horsham isn’t making chainmail for movies. He’s making it for architects. The material is incredibly light, only uses 20% of the energy needed to produce steel, and is 100% recyclable. Ten years into Horsham’s business, Kaynemaile has been used in everything from carpark facades to privacy screens in tech offices. An installation of different colored types of Kaynemaile is currently on view in the middle of New York City’s Times Square as part of NYCxDesign, where it won best new architectural product at the NYCxDesign Awards.


Nerdist: THE LORD OF THE RINGS CHAINMAIL HAS EVOLVED INTO A VERSATILE BUILDING MATERIAL
May 25th, 2017

Part of the magic of the movies is that for 90 or so minutes, they convince us the world we’re immersed in has some level of reality, or at least believability, through means that aren’t necessarily true to what we’re watching on screen. For example, any big-budget superhero movie involves a lot of acting in front of a green screen. As you also might imagine, costumes aren’t always what they seem either.

The actors in The Lord of the Rings movies aren’t wearing actual chainmail during battle scenes, because the heavy material would be exhausting to wear during an entire long day of filming. Instead, the movies’ creature, armor, and weapons art director, Kayne Horsham, created a lighter alternative that was linked and woven by hand, then covered in a layer of pure silver. Creating the chainmail by hand took a painstakingly long time, especially considering all the battle participants who wore it, so when Horsham began brainstorming a better way to do it, he inadvertently came up with a construction material of the future (via Fast Company).

He pioneered an injection molding process that could mass produce polycarbonate chainmail, and nowadays, the material is used more by architects than actors. Kaynemaile, which got its name from Viggo Mortensen’s nickname for the original material, is light, completely recyclable, and uses 20% of the energy needed to produce steel. Check out this list of attributes, from the story that details some of Kaynemaile’s real-world applications:

“When used as a facade, it dramatically reduces the solar energy entering a building by 80%. In a parking lot in southern California, Horsham says that the Kaynemaile facade reduced the temperature by nearly 60 degrees Fahrenheit. It’s been used as a protector for external staircases on buildings–it’s so strong that you can hang a single piece that’s 16 floors high without the kind of structural support you’d need if the mesh was made of metal. Because it moves with the environment, Kaynemaile is also ideal in areas with seismic activity.”


Designboom: Kaynemaile is a chainmail-like architectural mesh made from recyclable plastic
23rd May, 2017

During this year’s NYCxDESIGN, a tricolored pavilion woven of red, white and blue plastic mesh popped up in times square. looking closely, the colorful walls of the installation are in fact not ‘walls’ at all, but have been created with a futuristic plastic chainmail-like fabric that goes by the name of kaynemaile.

The mesh — made from a recyclable polycarbonate — has been created by lord of the rings set designer kayne horsham, who became rather practiced in the art of designing and creating chainmail during his work on the fantasy trilogy for which he wove millions of rings into armor robes for viggo morteson and orlando bloom alike. The patented plastic mesh is already being used by architects to create, divide and protect building interiors and exteriors around the world.

After hours spent hand assembling chainmail suits during his lord of the rings career, horsham came to the idea that there must be an easier was to create fabrics of a similar structure without interlinking each loop by hand. to produce kaynemaile — which was awarded best architectural product at the NYCxDESIGN award — horsham experimented to produce a seamless plastic mesh via an injection moulding process, eventually creating a 3D material made up of solid rings with no joints or seems. This means that kaynemaile can be produced in unlimited sizes, using a wide range of colors. The fabric itself is made from a recyclable, UV stabilized high-spec polycarbonate, which is resistant to fire and almost impossible to damage.


Interior Design: NYCxDesign Awards Toasts City’s Best at MoMA
May 20th, 2017

Hundreds gathered at the Roy and Niuta Titus Theater at MoMA this weekend to celebrate the honorees and winners of the second annual NYCxDesign Awards presented by Interior Design and ICFF. Editor in chief Cindy Allen hosted the event, which received over 700 entries—almost double the number from last year. "It's year two and our feet are firmly planted," Allen told the crowd in her intro. "It was very hard to edit it down—there were a lot of sleepless nights—and now we know we have something really special."

“Entries came from 109 design firms and 210 manufacturers with 60 international companies showing product at NYCxDESIGN—a perfect combination of global design in our beloved home town," Allen continued. Winners, who took home a custom prize designed by award sponsor Lladró, were named in over 50 categories across both products and projects. 

The captive audience of design industry professionals and their friends were joined by a global audience of thousands via Interior Design's broadcast on Facebook Live. The event was made possible by Cancos Tile & StoneShaw Contract, and Haworth.


Dexigner: #WaveNewYork: Kaynemaile NYCxDesign Exhibition
May 20th, 2017

On Thursday, Kaynemaile has unveiled a 4 foot high, 425 square foot walk-through "touch and see" experiential installation in Times Square as part of NYCxDesign. The installation is situated on the Design Pavilion on a pedestrian-friendly plaza between 44th Street and Seventh Avenue. Kaynemaile, a revolutionary architectural and design material that is playing an integral part in NYC's infrastructure renewal projects, was invented by former Weta Workshop artistic director Kayne Horsham after his experience working with chainmail costumes on the Academy Award-winning The Lord of the Rings trilogy. Recognizing chainmail's durability and design potential, Horsham invented and patented the world's first injection moulding process that creates interlocked mesh rings-without any joins or distracting gaps-that can be produced on an industrial scale to any dimensions. Those visiting the installation will see how Kaynemaile accents the link between art & science with seamless polycarbonate architectural mesh.


Architect Magazine: Kaynemaile's #WAVENEWYORK at NYCxDesign
24th May, 2017

The interactive Installation by the New Zealand-based manufacturer features mesh interlocking rings and a liquid state assembling process.

To those who are familiar to New York, Times Square is a nightmarish intersection overcrowded with people and speeding cars. But somehow New Zealand–based architectural mesh manufacturer Kaynemaile made walking through it a little bit more enjoyable with its installation for this year's NYCxDesign festival. So much that it was awarded the festival's Best Architectural Product. Dubbed #WaveNewYork, the 14 foot-tall, 425-square-foot walk-through construction allows for an experiential experience, allowing you to “touch and see” the colorful piece between 44th Street and Seventh Avenue.

”The material is beautiful, the installation design is playful and interactive, and the concept has pure innovation at its core,” said Ilene Shaw, director and curator of NYCxDesign. The festival, which takes place in New York each May, is a collaborative platform for cultural and commercial opportunities, and a citywide celebration of design for both established and emerging design practices.

More than one million painted, interlocking rings are used in the kinetic installation, which is made from a seamless polycarbonate architectural mesh—the same material used to manufacture aircraft windows and astronaut helmets. The material is stronger and lighter than glass, reacts well with light, and is 100 percent recyclable.

Kaynemaile seamless mesh is based on a traditional European chainmail assembly, and produced by the world’s first liquid state assembling process. This process is able to form a 3D impact-absorbing structure composed of solid rings with no joints or seams and an excellent strength-to-weight ratio.

The Installation is a collaboration between Kaynemaile CEO Kayne Horsham—the inventor of the mesh and liquid state manufacturing processes—and Ned Kahn, American artist and fellow MacArthur fellow. 


Metropolis: Design Pavilion 2017 Takes Over Times Square
May 11th, 2017

The pavilion will be made up of a market and eight installations, varying from interactive sculpture to a virtual reality station.

The 2016 Design Pavilion put a spotlight on bustling Astor Place. This year, the five-day cultural design event will find its home in Times Square, the city’s unrivaled hub. The pavilion will be made up of eight installations and a market, with the common theme of activating public space and exploring the intersections between design and other disciplines. DuPont Corian will be partnering with design team Birsel + Seck to develop a “barlike” structure, which will examine what movement means in a public space, while kinetic sculptor Ned Kahn will be pairing up with Kaynemaile to produce an interactive installation made of poly-carbonate architectural mesh. Other highlights include a virtual reality pavilion and an information kiosk that will disseminate information on various NYCxDESIGN events. In conjunction with IBM, the pavilion will also present the NYC Design Talks over 20 sessions to explore the relationship between design and technology, business, and lifestyle. Held between May 3 and 20 at Parsons School of Design, the Cooper Union, and the Fashion Institute of Technology, the talks will feature some of design’s most insightful thinkers, writers, and makers.


Kaynemaile Sponsorship: Luba Lukova: Designing Justice exhibition at MODA
June 4—September 3, 2017

We’re excited to be supporting the 'Luba Lukova: Designing Justice' exhibition at MODA (the Museum of Design Atlanta). We love their vision to embrace and celebrate design and its power to change the world. Kaynemaile supplied two Water Clear mesh hanging screens to divide the exhibition space. Images of the exhibition coming soon. For more information on the exhibition, visit their website:


Denizen: How a Lord of the Rings costume designer has taken out the NYCxDesign award
25th May, 2017

To go from costume designer to architectural pioneer is exactly what Weta Workshop alumnus Kayne Horsham has done. Currently exhibiting at #WaveNewYork, Horsham was once responsible for forging the chainmail uniforms worn by the likes of Viggo Mortenson (Aragorn), Orlando Bloom (Legolas) and many more in the Lord of the Rings films.

Having hand woven hundreds of thousands of the polycarbonate loops together over the 3-4 years of filming, the weapons and costume designer figured there must be a less tedious and time-consuming process for creating the material. Fast-forward a few years and the ingenious creator, along with the help of a shrewd engineer, came up with an injection moulding process that allowed him to mass-produce the versatile material.

In amplifying the scale, the full potential of the product was realised. Architects, in particular, have been making use of ultra-light textile for things as different as car park building façades to privacy screens in tech offices. Made of the same material as astronaut helmets and bulletproof glass, when used on the exterior of buildings, it can reduce the solar energy entering a building by 80%. Requiring a mere 20% of the energy needed to produce steel, ‘Kaynemaile’ is also 100% recyclable.


Idealog: Lord of the mesh rings: Kaynemaile slays competition for global architecture prize
23rd May, 2017

Need to orc-proof your building? A new type of chainmail that's just won a major international award can help.

Kayne Horsham is the inventor of Kaynemaile, a revolutionary polycarbonate architectural mesh for building exteriors and interiors that has won the Best Architectural Product at the NYCxDesign Awards at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

In 2007 Horsham patented a technology that creates interlocked seamless mesh rings without any joins or gaps. He began experimenting with the mesh while working as an artistic director of Creatures, Armor and Weapons at Weta Workshop – working closely with Sir Peter Jackson for four years on the costumes for The Lord of the Rings.

Part of Kaynemaile’s secret is that it’s made from the same material that’s used to manufacture F16 fighter jet cockpits, helmets for astronauts, and airplane windows. Stronger and lighter than glass, it also reacts well when bright lights are shined against it.

The Kaynemaile mesh is based on a traditional European chainmail assembly, but is produced via the world’s first liquid state assembling process, able to form a 3D impact-absorbing structure made up of solid rings with no joins or seams. Oh, and it’s also 100 percent recyclable – pretty handy if someone wearing it is somehow slain by a horde of angry orcs.

 

Kaynemaile wins at NYCxDesign Awards
22nd May, 2017

New Zealand company Kaynemaile has won Best Architectural Product at the NYCxDesign Awards, announced 20 May.

Kayne Horsham, inventor of Kaynemaile – an innovative polycarbonate architectural mesh for building exteriors and interiors – accepted the award at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

Kaynemaile is currently exhibiting in the centre of New York’s Times Square with a 4.25 metre high, 40 square metre walk-though “touch and see” installation called #WaveNewYork.

The one million interlocking rings forming the installation were created using Kaynemaile’s liquid state manufacturing process at its Petone, Wellington design studio and factory.

#WaveNewYork has been designed by Kayne Horsham and American artist and MacArthur fellow Ned Kahn, who are also currently working on a dramatic art installation, to be unveiled this summer in New York.

“We’re honoured to be in the heart of New York bringing the freedom and joy embodied in our design to over a million New Yorkers and visitors from throughout America and the world in Times Square,” comments Kayne.

 

Stuff: Chain reaction leads to NYCxDesign award for NZ company Kaynemaile
May 21st, 2017

A Petone-based company and its polycarbonate chainmail mesh has been recognised on the world stage, winning big at the NYCxDesign Awards. 

Kaynemaile won best architectural product at the awards this week. The company produces the eponymous Kaynemaile, used to create, divide and protect building interiors and exteriors. 

Kaynemaile is currently exhibiting #WaveNewYork in Times Square, as part of the NYCxDesign festival. The 40-square-metre walk-through installation includes one million interlocking rings, and is 4.25 metres high. 

Inventor Kayne Horsham and American artist Ned Kahn designed the installation.

Horsham said he was delighted to be exhibiting in New York, and hoped the installation would lead to more opportunities in the US. 

"We're honoured to be in the heart of New York, bringing the freedom and joy embodied in our design to over a million New Yorkers and visitors from throughout America and the world in Times Square.

"New York and New Zealand are global centres of innovation and leaders in design. The NYCxDesign Award for Best Architectural Product perfectly supports our US market entry."

 

The Dominion Post: Product of Middle-earth headed for Big Apple
May 11th, 2017

From the shadows of Mordor to the bright lights of New York City, a Lower Hutt based company is taking its product to the world.

An architectural polycarbonate mesh produced by Kaynemaile will be used to create a centrepiece exhibit in Times Square for the NYCxDesign festival.

More than one million interlocked rings were used to create the interactive installation which will be on display from May 18 to May 22.

The Kaynemaile component of the installation was made in Petone before being sent to New York.

 

The Manufacturers Success Connection: New Zealand company Kaynemaile has won Best Architectural Product at the NYCxDesign Awards
May 22nd, 2017

New Zealand company Kaynemaile has won Best Architectural Product at the NYCxDesign Awards announced today. Link to NYCxDesign Award finalists

Kayne Horsham, inventor of Kaynemaile, a revolutionary polycarbonate architectural mesh for building exteriors and interiors, accepted the award at New York’s Museum of Modern Art.

In 2007 Horsham patented an award-winning technology that creates interlocked seamless mesh rings without any joins or gaps. Horsham began experimenting with the mesh while working as an Artistic Director of Creatures, Armor and Weapons at Weta Workshop. He worked closely with director Peter Jackson for four years, fabricating the costumes of the Academy Award-winning The Lord of the Rings trilogy.

Kaynemaile is currently exhibiting in the centre of New York’s Times Square with a 4.25 metre high, 40 square metre walk-though “touch and see” installation called #WaveNewYork. The one million interlocking rings forming the installation were created using Kaynemaile’s liquid state manufacturing process at its Petone, Wellington design studio and factory.

“We’re honoured to be in the heart of New York bringing the freedom and joy embodied in our design to over a million New Yorkers and visitors from throughout America and the world in Times Square,” says Kayne. “New York and New Zealand are global centres of innovation and leaders in design. The NYCxDesign Award for Best Architectural Product perfectly supports our U.S. market entry.”

Kaynemaile reimagines 2000-year-old chainmail and has applied to a variety of architectural structures including large scale building and carpark wraps, shading for rain, wind and sun, airport security screens, hotel ceiling systems, university walkways, office partitions, lighting fixtures, and kinetic art installations. Kaynemaile has been installed worldwide by building owners, developers, transit authorities, corporate headquarters, and shopping centers.


Wellingtn Scoop: Million mesh rings from Petone to be centrepiece of a festival in New York
May 10th, 2017

News from Kaynemaile

Over one million interlocked rings made in Petone from Kaynemaile’s innovative and seamless architectural mesh are to be installed in New York City’s Times Square as a centrepiece of the 2017 NYCxDESIGN festival this month.

Kaynemaile was invented by former Weta Workshop Artistic Director Kayne Horsham in 2002, following his experience working with chainmail costumes on the Lord of the Rings trilogy. Kayne invented and patented the world’s first liquid state assembly process to create lightweight interlocked mesh rings that look exactly like chainmail, and are featuring in high-profile design projects across the world.

 

Wellington Scoop: From the Battle of Helms Deep to Times Square
May 8th, 2017

Over one million interlocked rings made from Kaynemaile’s innovative and seamless architectural mesh are to be installed in New York City’s Times Square as a centrepiece of the 2017 NYCxDESIGN festival, May 18-22.

Kaynemaile was invented by former Weta Workshop Artistic Director Kayne Horsham in 2002, following his experience working with chainmail costumes on the Lord of the Rings trilogy. Kayne invented and patented the world’s first liquid state assembly process to create lightweight interlocked mesh rings that look exactly like chainmail, and are featuring in high-profile design projects across the world...